PHANTASTES A FAERIE ROMANCE - online book

A fantasy novel by George MacDonald

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A FAERIE ROMANCE.                         93
burning, with a dim, reddish flame, and the head of a woman, bent downwards, as if reading by its light. I could see nothing more for a few moments. At length, as my eyes got used to the dimness of the place, I saw that the part of the rude building near me was used for household purposes; for several rough utensils lay here and there, and a bed stood in the corner. An irresistible attraction caused me to enter. The woman never raised her face, the upper part of wrhich alone I could see distinctly; but, as soon as I stepped within the threshold, she began to read aloud, in a low and not altogether unpleasing voice, from an ancient little volume which she held open with one hand on the table upon which stood the lamp. What she read was something like this:
" So, then, as darkness had no beginning, neither will it ever have an end. So, then, is it eternal. The , negation of aught else, is its affirmation. Where the light cannot come, there abideth the darkness. The light doth but hollow a mine out of the infinite extension of the darkness. And ever upon the steps of the light treadeth the darkness; yea, springeth in fountains and wells amidst it, from the secret chan­nels of its mighty sea. Truly, man is but a passing flame, moving unquietly amid the surrounding rest
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