A fantasy novel by George MacDonald

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178                           PHANTASTES:
stood in her dressing-room, and of which she con­stantly made use."
Here the speaker's voice sank to a whisper; and Cosmo, although his very soul sat listening in his ears, could hear no more. He trembled too much to dare to address the ladies, even if it had been advisable to expose himself to their curiosity. The name of the Princess was well known to him, but he had never seen her; except indeed it was she, which now he hardly doubted, who had knelt before him on that dreadful night Fearful of attracting attention, for, from the weak state of his health, he could not recover an appearance of calmness, he made his way to the open air, and reached his lodgings; glad in this, that he at least knew where she lived, although he never dreamed of approaching her openly, even if he should be happy enough to free her from her hateful bondage. He hoped, too, that as he had unexpectedly learned so much, the other and far more
important part might be revealed to him ere long.
" Have you seen Steinwald lately?"
" No, I have not seen him for some time. He is almost a match for me at the rapier, and I suppose he thinks he needs no more lessons."
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