A Children's Fantasy Book By George MacDonald - illustrated version.

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9$                  THE PRINCESS AND CURDIE.
Poor Lina looked much better in it. Nor could any one have called it a piece of finery. If ever green eyes with a yellow light in them looked grateful, hers did.
As they had no longer any bag to carry them in, Curdie and Lina now ate what was left of the provisions. Then they set out again upon their journey. For seven days it lasted. They met with various adventures, and in all of them Lina proved so helpful, and so ready to risk her life for the sake of her companion, that Curdie grew not merely very fond but very trustful of her, and her ugli­ness, which at first only moved his pity, now actually increased his affection for her. One day, looking at her stretched on the grass before him, he said,—
" Oh, Lina! if the princess would but burn you in her fire of roses! "
She looked up at him, gave a mourful whine like a dog, and laid her head on his feet. What or how much he could not tell, but clearly she had gathered something from his words.
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