A Children's Fantasy Book By George MacDonald - illustrated version.

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THE LORD CHAMBERLAIN.                  171
whatever she read, the king listened as if he had never heard anything so good before, making out in it the wisest meanings. Every now and then he asked for a piece of bread and a little wine, and every time he ate and drank he slept, and every time he woke he seemed better than the last time. The princess bearing her part, the loaf was eaten up and the flagon emptied before night. The butler took the flagon away, and brought it back filled to the brim, but both were thirsty as well as hungry when Curdie came again.
Meantime he and Lina, watching and waking alter­nately, had plenty of sleep. Ifi the afternoon, peeping from the recess, they saw several of the servants enter hurriedly, one after the other, draw wine, drink it, and steal out; but their business was to take care of the king, not of his cellar, and they let them drink. Also, when the butler came to fill the flagon, they restrained them­selves, for the villain's fate was not yet ready for him. He looked terribly frightened, and had brought with him a'large candle and a small terrier—which latter indeed threatened to be troublesome, for he went roving and sniffing about until he came to the recess where they were. But as soon as he showed hifnself, Lina opened her jaws so wide, and glared at him so horribly, that, without even uttering a whimper, he tucked his tail be­tween his legs and ran to his master. He was drawing
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