A Children's Fantasy Book By George MacDonald - illustrated version.

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216                  THE PRINCESS AND CURDIE.
principle, grounded in inborn invariable instinct, was, that every One should take care of that One. This was the first duty of Man. If every one would but obey this law, number one, then would every one be perfectly cared for—one being always equal to one. But the faculty of care was in excess of need, and all that overflowed, and would otherwise run to waste, ought to be gently turned in the direction of one's neighbour, seeing that this also wrought for the fulfilling of the law, inasmuch as the reaction of excess so directed was upon the director of the same, to the comfort, that is, and well-being of the original self. To be just and friendly was to build the warmest and safest of all nests, and to be kind and loving was to line it with the softest of all furs and feathers, for the one precious, comfort-loving self there to lie, revelling in downiest bliss. One of the laws therefore most bind­ing upon men because of its relation to the first and greatest of all duties, was embodied in the Proverb he had just read ; and what stronger proof of its wisdom and truth could they desire than the sudden and com­plete vengeance which had fallen upon those worse than ordinary sinners who had offended against the king's majesty by forgetting that Honesty is the best Policy ?
At this point of the discourse the head of the legser-pent rose from the floor of the temple, towering above the pulpit, above the priest, then curving downwards,
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