The Princess and the Goblin - online book

A Children's Fantasy Book By George MacDonald - illustrated version.

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Why the Princess has a Story 13
of generations; and no wonder, seeing they lived away from the sun, in cold and wet and dark places. They were now, not ordinarily ugly, but either absolutely hideous, or ludicrously grotesque both in face and form. There was no invention, they said, of the most lawless imagina­tion expressed by pen or pencil, that could sur­pass the extravagance of their appearance. But I suspect those who said so, had mistaken some of their animal companions for the goblins them­selves—of which more by and by. The goblins themselves were not so far removed from the human as such a description would imply. And as they grew misshapen in body, they had grown in knowledge and cleverness, and now were able to do things no mortal could see the possibility }f. But as they grew in cunning, they grew in mischief, and their great delight was in every way they could think of to annoy the people who lived in the open-air-storey above them. They had enough of affection left for each other, to preserve them from being absolutely cruel for cruelty's sake to those that came in their way; but still they so heartily cherished the ancestral grudge against those who occupied their former
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