The Princess and the Goblin - online book

A Children's Fantasy Book By George MacDonald - illustrated version.

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136 The Princess and the Goblin
ever efforts Lootie might make to get at her thoughts. And Lootie had to say to herself, " What an odd child she is!" and give it up.
At length the longed-for Friday arrived, and lest Lootie should be moved to watch her, Irene endeavoured to keep herself as quiet as possible. In the afternoon she asked for her doll's house, and went on arranging and re-arranging the various rooms and their inhabitants for a whole hour. Then she gave a sigh and threw herself back in her chair. One of the dolls would not sit, and another would not stand, and they were all very tiresome. Indeed there was one would not even lie down, which was too bad. But it was now getting dark, and the darker it got the more excited Irene became, and the more she felt it necessary to be composed.
"I see you want your tea, princess," said the nurse: "I will go and get it. The room feels close: I will open the window a little. The evening is mild: it won't hurt you."
" There's no fear of that, Lootie," said Irene, wishing she had put off going for the tea till it was darker, when she might have made hei attempt with every advantage.
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