The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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4
THE SECRET GARDEN
from England. The child stared at him, but she stared most at her mother. She always did this when she had a chance to see her, because the Mem Sahib — Mary used to call her that oftener than anything else — was such a tall, slim, pretty person and wore such lovely clothes. Her hair was like curly silk and she had a delicate little nose which seemed to be disdaining things, and she had large laughing eyes. All her clothes were thin and floating, and Mary said they were " full of lace." They looked fuller of lace than ever this morning, but her eyes were not laughing at all. They were large and scared and lifted im­ploringly to the fair boy officer's face.
" Is it so very bad? Oh, is it? " Mary heard her say.
" Awfully," the young man answered in a trem­bling voice. " Awfully, Mrs. Lennox. You ought to have gone to the hills two weeks ago."
The Mem Sahib wrung her hands.
" Oh, I know I ought! " she cried. " I only stayed to go to that silly dinner party. What a fool I was! "
At that very moment such a loud sound of wail­ing broke out from the servants' quarters that she clutched the young man's arm, and Mary stood shivering from head to foot. The wailing grew wilder and wilder.