The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

MISTRESS MARY
15
" Perhaps she will Improve as she grows older," the officer's wife said good-naturedly. " If she were not so sallow and had a nicer expression, her features are rather good. Children alter so much."
" She'll have to alter a good deal," answered Mrs. Medlock. " And there's nothing likely to improve children at Misselthwaite if you ask me!"
They thought Mary was not listening because she was standing a little apart from them at the window of the private hotel they had gone to. She was watching the passing buses and cabs, and people, but she heard quite well and was made very curious about her uncle and the place he lived in. What sort of a place was it, and what would he be like? What was a hunchback? She had never seen one. Perhaps there were none in India.
Since she had been living in other people's houses and had had no Ayah, she had begun to feel lonely and to think queer thoughts which were new to her. She had begun to wonder why she had never seemed to belong to any one even when her father and mother had been alive. Other children seemed to belong to their fathers and mothers, but she had never seemed to really be any one's little girl. She had had servants, and food and clothes, but no one had taken any notice