The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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56             THE SECRET GARDEN
But the big breaths of rough fresh air blown over the heather filled her lungs with something which was good for her whole thin body and whipped some red color into her cheeks and brightened her dull eyes when she did not know anything about it.
But after a few days spent almost entirely out of doors she wakened one morning knowing what it was to be hungry, and when she sat down to her breakfast she did not glance disdainfully at her porridge and push it away, but took up her spoon and began to eat it and went on eating it until her bowl was empty.
" Tha' got on well enough with that this mornin', didn't tha'? " said Martha.
" It tastes nice to-day," said Mary, feeling a little surprised herself.
" It's th' air of th' moor that's givin' thee stomach for tha' victuals," answered Martha. " It's lucky for thee that tha's got victuals as well as appetite. There's been twelve in our cottage as had th' stomach an' nothin' to put in it. You go on playin' you out o' doors every day an' you'll get some flesh on your bones an' you won't be so yeller."
" I don't play," said Mary. " I have nothing to play with."
" Nothin' to play with! " exclaimed Martha.