The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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64             THE SECRET GARDEN
opened somewhere down-stairs; for a great rush­ing draft blew along the passage and the door of the room they sat in was blown open with a crash, and as they both jumped to their feet the light was blown out and the crying sound was swept down the far corridor so that it was to be heard more plainly than ever.
" There ! " said Mary. " I told you so 1 It is some one crying — and it isn't a grown-up per­son."
Martha ran and shut the door and turned the key, but before she did it they both heard the sound of a door in some far passage shutting with a bang, and then everything was quiet, for even the wind ceased " wutherin' " for a few moments.
" It was th' wind," said Martha stubbornly. " An' if it wasn't, it was little Betty Butterworth, th' scullery-maid. She's had th' toothache all day."
But something troubled and awkward in her manner made Mistress Mary stare very hard at her. She did not believe she was speaking the truth.