The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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90             THE SECRET GARDEN
she began fumblin' in her pocket an' she says to me 1 Martha, tha's brought me thy wages like a good lass, an' I've got four places to put every penny, but I'm just goin' to take tuppence out of it to buy that child a skippin'-rope,' an' she bought one an' here it is."
She brought it out from under her apron and exhibited it quite proudly. It was a strong, slender rope with a striped red and blue handle at each end, but Mary Lennox had never seen a skip­ping-rope before. She gazed at it with a mysti­fied expression.
" What is it for? " she asked curiously.
" For! " cried out Martha. " Does tha' mean that they've not got skippin'-ropes in India, for all they've got elephants and tigers and camels! No wonder most of 'em's black. This is what it's for; just watch me."
And she ran into the middle of the room and, taking a handle in each hand, began to skip, and skip, and skip, while Mary turned in her chair to stare at her, and the queer faces in the old por­traits seemed to stare at her, too, and wonder what on earth this common little cottager had the impu­dence to be doing under their very noses. But Martha did not even see them. The interest and curiosity in Mistress Mary's face delighted her,