The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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NEST BUILDING
199
They settled down softly upon the grass and sat there without moving.
" Us mustn't seem as if us was watchin' him too close," said Dickon. " He'd be out with us for good if he got th' notion us was interferin' now. He'll be a good bit different till all this is over. He's settin' up housekeepin'. He'll be shyer an' readier to take things ill. He's got no time for visitin' an' gossipin'. Us must keep still a bit an' try to look as if us was grass an' trees an' bushes. Then when he's got used to seein' us I'll chirp a bit an' he'll know us'll not be in his way."
Mistress Mary was not at all sure that she knew, as Dickon seemed to, how to try to look like grass and trees and bushes. But he had said the queer thing as if it were the simplest and most natural thing in the world, and she felt it must be quite easy to him, and indeed she watched him for a few minutes carefully, wondering if it was possible for him to quietly turn green and put out branches and leaves. But he only sat wonderfully still, and when he spoke dropped his voice to such a softness that it was curious that she could hear him, but she could.
** It's part o' th' springtime, this nest-buildin' is," he said. " I warrant it's been goin' on in th' same way every year since th' world was begun.