The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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2o8           THE SECRET GARDEN
had taught Mary to use all her tools, so that by this time it was plain that though the lovely wild place was not likely to become a " gardener's garden " it would be a wilderness of growing things before the springtime was over.
" There'll be apple blossoms an' cherry blos­soms overhead," Dickon said, working away with all his might. " An' there'll be peach an' plum trees in bloom against th' walls, an' th' grass'll be a carpet o' flowers."
The little fox and the rook were as happy and busy as they were, and the robin and his mate flew backward and forward like tiny streaks of lightning. Sometimes the rook flapped his black wings and soared away over the tree-tops in the park. Each time he came back and perched near Dickon and cawed several times as if he were re­lating his adventures, and Dickon talked to him just as he had talked to the robin. Once when Dickon was so busy that he did not answer him at first, Soot flew on to his shoulders and gently tweaked his ear with his large beak. When Mary wanted to rest a little Dickon sat down with her under a tree and once he took his pipe out of his pocket and played the soft strange little notes and two squirrels appeared on the wall and looked and listened.
" Tha's a good bit stronger than tha' was,"