The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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2i6           THE SECRET GARDEN
the package wondering it he had sent a doll, and also wondering what she should do with it if he had. But he had not sent one. There were sev­eral beautiful books such as Colin had, and two of them were about gardens and were full of pictures. There were two or three games and there was a beautiful little writing-case with a gold monogram on it and a gold pen and inkstand.
Everything was so nice that her pleasure began to crowd her anger out of her mind. She had not expected him to remember her at all and her hard little heart grew quite warm.
" I can write better than I can print," she said, " and the first thing I shall write with that pen will be a letter to tell him I am much obliged."
If she had been friends with Colin she would have run to show him her presents at once, and they would have looked at the pictures and read some of the gardening books and perhaps tried playing the games, and he would have enjoyed himself so much he would never once have thought he was going to die or have put his hand on his spine to see if there was a lump coming. He had a way of doing that which she could not bear. It gave her an uncomfortable frightened feeling be­cause he always looked so frightened himself. He said that if he felt even quite a little lump some day he should know his hunch had begun to grow.