The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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Rumors of the new and curious things which were occurring in the invalid's apartments had of course filtered through the servants' hall into the stable yards and out among the gardeners, but notwithstanding this, Mr. Roach was startled one day when he received orders from Master Colin's room to the effect that he must report himself in the apartment no outsider had ever seen, as the in­valid himself desired to speak to him.
" Well, well," he said to himself as he hurriedly changed his coat, " what's to do now? His Royal Highness that wasn't to be looked at calling up a man he's never set eyes on."
Mr. Roach was not without curiosity. He had never caught even a glimpse of the boy and had heard a dozen exaggerated stories about his un­canny looks and ways and his insane tempers. The thing he had heard oftenest was that he might die at any moment and there had been numerous fanciful descriptions of a humped back and help­less limbs, given by people who had never seen him.
" Things are changing in this house, Mr. Roach," said Mrs. Medlock, as she led him up the back staircase to the corridor on to which opened the hitherto mysterious chamber.
" Let's hope they're changing for the better, Mrs. Medlock," he answered.