The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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258           THE SECRET GARDEN
" They couldn't well change for the worse," she continued; M and queer as it all is there's them as finds their duties made a lot easier to stand up under. Don't you be surprised, Mr. Roach, if you find yourself in the middle of a menagerie and Martha Sowerby's Dickon more at home than you or me could ever be."
There really was a sort of Magic about Dickon, as Mary always privately believed. When Mr. Roach heard his name he smiled quite leniently.
" He'd be at home in Buckingham Palace or at the bottom of a coal mine," he said. " And yet it's not impudence, either. He's just fine, is that lad."
It was perhaps well he had been prepared or he might have been startled. When the bedroom door was opened a large crow, which seemed quite at home perched on the high back of a carven chair, announced the entrance of a visitor by say­ing " Caw — Caw " quite loudly. In spite of Mrs. Medlock's warning, Mr. Roach only just escaped being sufficiently undignified to jump back­ward.
The young Rajah was neither in bed nor on his sofa. He was sitting in an armchair and a young lamb was standing by him shaking its tail in feed­ing-lamb fashion as Dickon knelt giving it milk