The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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266           THE SECRET GARDEN
And this is the ivy the wind blew back," and she took hold of the hanging green curtain.
" Oh! is it — is it! " gasped Colin.
" And here is the handle, and here is the door. Dickon push him in — push him in quickly! "
And Dickon did it with one strong, steady, splen­did push.
But Colin had actually dropped back against his cushions, even though he gasped with delight, and he had covered his eyes with his hands and held them there shutting out everything until they were inside and the chair stopped as if by magic and the door was closed. Not till then did he take them away and look round and round and round as Dickon and Mary had done. And over walls and earth and trees and swinging sprays and ten­drils the fair green veil of tender little leaves had crept, and in the grass under the trees and the gray urns in the alcoves and here and there every­where were touches or splashes of gold and purple and white and the trees were showing pink and snow above his head and there were fluttering of wings and faint sweet pipes and humming and scents and scents. And the sun fell warm upon his face like a hand with a lovely touch. And in wonder Mary and Dickon stood and stared at him. He looked so strange and different because a pink