The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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2jo           THE SECRET GARDEN
They drew the chair under the plum-tree, which was snow-white with blossoms and musical with bees. It was like a king's canopy, a fairy king's. There were flowering cherry-trees near and apple-trees whose buds were pink and white, and here and there one had burst open wide. Between the blossoming branches of the canopy bits of blue sky looked down like wonderful eyes.
Mary and Dickon worked a little here and there and Colin watched them. They brought him things to look at — buds which were opening, buds which were tight closed, bits of twig whose leaves were just showing green, the feather of a woodpecker which had,dropped on the grass, the empty shell of some bird early hatched. Dickon pushed the chair slowly round and round the gar­den, stopping every other moment to let him look at wonders springing out of the earth or trailing down from trees. It was like being taken in state round the country of a magic king and queen and shown all the mysterious riches it contained.
"I wonder if we shall see the robin?" said Colin.
" Tha'll see him often enow after a bit," an­swered Dickon. " When th' eggs hatches out th' litde chap he'll be kep' so busy it'll make his head swim. Tha'll see him flyin' backward an' for'ard