The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search

Share page  

Previous Contents Next

BEN WEATHERSTAFF            271
carryin' worms nigh as big as himsel' an' that much noise goin' on in th' nest when he gets there as fair flusters him so as he scarce knows which big mouth to drop th' first piece in. An' gapin' beaks an' squawks on every side. Mother says as when she sees th' work a robin has to keep them gapin' beaks filled, she feels like she was a lady with nothin' to do. She says she's seen th' little chaps when it seemed like th' sweat must be droppin' off 'em, though folk can't see it."
This made them giggle so delightedly that they were obliged to cover their mouths with their hands, remembering that they must not be heard. Colin had been instructed as to the law of whis­pers and low voices several days before. He liked the mysteriousness of it and did his best, but in the midst of excited enjoyment it is rather diffi­cult never to laugh above a whisper.
Every moment of the afternoon was full of new things and every hour the sunshine grew more golden. The wheeled chair had been drawn back under the canopy and Dickon had sat down on the grass and had just drawn out his pipe when Colin saw something he had not had time to notice be­fore.
" That's a very old tree over there, isn't it? " he said