The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search

Share page  

Previous Contents Next

« LET THEM LAUGH "            311
was still a long clear twilight to work in and that was her quiet time. She could sit upon the low rough wall and look on and hear stories of the day. She loved this time. There were not only vegetables in this garden. Dickon had bought penny packages of flower seeds now and then and sown bright sweet-scented things among gooseberry bushes and even cabbages and he grew borders of mignonette and pinks and pansies and things whose seeds he could save year after year or whose roots would bloom each spring and spread in time into fine clumps. The low wall was one of the prettiest things in Yorkshire because he had tucked moorland foxglove and ferns and rock-cress and hedgerow flowers into every crevice until only here and there glimpses of the stones were to be seen.
" All a chap's got to do to make 'em thrive, mother," he would say, " is to be friends with 'em for sure. They're just like th' * creatures.' If they're thirsty give 'em a drink and if they're hungry give 'em a bit o' food. They want to live same as we do. If they died I should feel as if I'd been a bad lad and somehow treated them heartless."
It was In these twilight hours that Mrs. Sow-erby heard of all that happened at Misselthwaite Manor. At first she was only told that " Mester