The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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3i4           THE SECRET GARDEN
Dickon stopped weeding and sat up on his heels to tell her. His eyes were twinkling with fun.
" Mester Colin is carried down to his chair every time he goes out," he explained. " An' he flies out at John, th' footman, for not carryin' him careful enough. He makes himself as help­less lookin' as he can an' never lifts his head until we're out o' sight o' th' house. An' he grunts an' frets a good bit when he's bein' settled into his chair. Him an' Miss Mary's both got to enjoyin' it an' when he groans an' complains she'll say, 'Poor Colin! Does it hurt you so much? Are you so weak as that, poor Colin? ' — but th' trouble is that sometimes they can scarce keep from burstin' out laughin'. When we get safe into the garden they laugh till they've no breath left to laugh with. An' they have to stuff their faces into Mester Colin's cushions to keep the gardeners from hearin', if any of 'em's about."
" Th' more they laugh th' better for 'em! " said Mrs. Sowerby, still laughing herself. " Good healthy child laughin's better than pills any day o' th' year. That pair'll plump up for sure."
" They are plumpin' up," said Dickon. " They're that hungry they don't know how to get enough to eat without makin' talk. Mester Colin says if he keeps sendin' for more food they won't believe he's an invalid at all. Miss Mary