The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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324           THE SECRET GARDEN
he stood upon his already steadied feet. Mary began to do them also. Soot, who was watching the performance, became much disturbed and left his branch and hopped about restlessly because he could not do them too.
From that time the exercises were part of the day's duties as much as the Magic was. It be­came possible for both Colin and Mary to do more of them each time they tried, and such ap­petites were the results that but for the basket Dickon put down behind the bush each morning when he arrived they would have been lost. But the little oven in the hollow and Mrs. Sowerby's bounties were so satisfying that Mrs. Medlock and the nurse and Dr. Craven became mystified again. You can trifle with your breakfast and seem to disdain your dinner if you are full to the brim with roasted eggs and potatoes and richly frothed new milk and oat-cakes and buns and heather honey and clotted cream.
" They are eating next to nothing," said the nurse. " They'll die of starvation if they can't be persuaded to take some nourishment. And yet see how they look."
" Look! " exclaimed Mrs. Medlock indig­nantly. " Eh! I'm moithered to death with them. They're a pair of young Satans. Bursting their jackets one day and the next turning up their noses