The Secret Garden, complete online version

First edition illustrated Children's Book By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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336           THE SECRET GARDEN
grimage. They found new corridors and cor­ners and flights of steps and new old pictures they liked and weird old things they did not know the use of. It was a curiously entertaining morning and the feeling of wandering about in the same house with other people but at the same time feel­ing as if one were miles away from them was a fascinating thing.
" I'm glad we came," Colin said. I never knew I lived in such a big queer old place. I like it. We will ramble about every rainy day. We shall always be finding new queer corners and things."
That morning they had found among other things such good appetites that when they returned to Colin's room it was not possible to send the luncheon away untouched.
When the nurse carried the tray down-stairs she slapped it down on the kitchen dresser so that Mrs. Loomis, the cook, could see the highly polished dishes and plates.
" Look at that! " she said. " This is a house of mystery, and those two children are the greatest mysteries in it."
" If they keep that up every day," said the strong young footman John, " there'd be small wonder that he weighs twice as much to-day as he did a month ago. I should have to give up my