Three Hundred Games & Pastimes - complete online book

A Book Of Suggestions For Children's Games And Employments.

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i8
What Shall We Do Now?
The feather, and kindred table games.
Russian scandal.
Advertise­ments.
If they have hit upon the right player she goes over to Queen Anne's side. But if not, the gipsies sing—
The ball is mine, it is not thine,
So you, proud Queen, sit still on your throne,
While we poor gipsies go and come.
They then turn round and hide the ball again.
A very exhausting game. The players sit round a table and form sides, one half against the other, and a little fluffy feather is placed in the middle. The aim of each side is to blow the feather so that it settles in the other camp, and to keep it from settling in their own.
The same game can be played with a marble on a table from which the table-cloth has been removed. In this case you all sink your faces to the level of the table.
Perhaps the best of all table games of this kind is " Squails " ; but this requires to be bought. A tiny set of ninepins can also lead to good fun, and a box of " Spillikins" is a useful possession. See page 65 for other table games, which are not, however, the best things for a large party.
The players sit in a long line or ring. The first, turning to the second, whispers very rapidly some remark or a brief storjr. The second, who may hear it distinctly, but probably does not, then whispers it as exactly as he can to the third player ; and so on until the line is finished. The last player then whispers it to the first player ; and the first player repeats his original remark to the company, and follows it with the form in which it. has just reached him.
All the players sit in a ring, except one, who stands in the middle holding a soft cushion. This he throws at any one of the players and begins to count ten. The person at whom the
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