Three Hundred Games & Pastimes - complete online book

A Book Of Suggestions For Children's Games And Employments.

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Cuttings.
Bedding-plants.
Herbs.
Wild-flowers transplanted.
276              What Shall We Do Now?
A great many plants can be grown from cuttings, which are little green shoots about 4 inches long, cut off just below a joint. The leaves immediately above the joint should be cut off with a sharp knife, and the cutting put into good sandy earth in a corner where it is not too sunny. It should be watered daily if the weather is dry, and it will root in about a month. Geraniums, fuchsias, pinks, carnations, old-man, and lavender, seldom fail to root.
There are certain tender plants, such as geraniums, fuchsias, heliotrope, and calceolarias, which will not stand being left out during the winter. These have, therefore (unless they can be wintered in a greenhouse), to be bought afresh each summer. They are best planted out in May or June, and must be well watered.
If in your garden there is room, it is very important to give a little space to herbs, on account of their sweetness. Lemon thyme is one of the sweetest, and if you can get a tiny piece of this it will increase very quickly. Rosemary, which you must protect a little in winter, and lavender, are almost necessary. These grow easily from cuttings (see above). Borage, which has a nice blue flower, can be grown from seed.
There are two other green plants so sweet that they should be grown if possibleó'Lemon Verbena, which, except in warm countries, must be well protected during winter, and should be grown against a warm wall, and Scented Geranium, which will have to be brought indoors during the winter.
If you live in the country there are several wild plants which grow well in gardens, such as ferns, primroses, foxgloves, and Creeping Jenny. In taking them up great care is needed to get the whole root. Plant them quickly, and water well. Only those that are really needed should be dug up, for to take wild-flowers from their proper place is a little like stealing from a garden that is open to every one.
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