Three Hundred Games & Pastimes - complete online book

A Book Of Suggestions For Children's Games And Employments.

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280              What Shall We Do Now?
and early (April) and late (May) flowering. From fourpence a dozen.
Winter Aconite.—Plant in September or October 2 inches deep and 3 inches apart. They will grow in dense shade and in poor soil. Two shillings a hundred.
Dahlias which, strictly speaking, are not bulbs, being grown from tubers, should be planted in May. In good soil they grow into very large bushy plants and must be given plenty of room. A strong stake should be driven in (well away from the roots) to support the plant, which can be carefully tied to it with bass. When frost has touched and spoilt the plants in November they must be dug up. The root will then have grown much larger and will consist of a number of knobby tubers. This has to be dried and put away where frost cannot get it, and in the spring the various tubers are separated and planted again.
Planting.
IV.—Roses
November is the best month for planting a new rose-tree, although it can be done until April. The plant should be kept indoors and well covered—for a cold wind would hurt its roots— until you have made the hole to put it in. This hole must be big enough for the root to stand in comfortably and for all the finer parts to be well spread out. If any part of the root is torn, cut it off with a sharp knife. It is best for two people to do the planting, one to hold the bush steadily in position and the other gently to put the earth back over the roots. When the hole is half filled press it down firmly over the roots with your foot. Then if the ground is dry give your plant half a can of water, wait until the water has sunk down and then fill up the hole with more earth. A little bracken or straw may be pegged down around the plant to protect its roots during the winter. Some
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