TOM SAWYER ABROAD TOM SAWYER, DETECTIVE
AND 16 OTHER STORIES - online book

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

116                          Tom Sawyer Abroad
country will look so like home and heaven to you that it will make your eyes water again.
It was just so with me, and the same with Jim.
And when Jim got so he could believe it was the land of Egypt he was looking at, he wouldn't enter it standing up, but got down on his knees and took off his hat, because he said it wasn't fitten' for a humble poor nigger to come any other way where such men had been as Moses and Joseph and Pharaoh and the other prophets. He was a Presbyterian, and had a most deep respect for Moses which was a Presbyterian, too, he said. He was all stirred up, and says:
" Hit's de Ian' of Egypt, de Ian' of Egypt, en I's 'lowed to look at it wid my own eyes ! En dah's de river dat was turn' to blood, en I's looking at de very same groun' whah de plagues was, en de lice, en de frogs, en de locus', en de hail, en whah dey marked de door-pos', en de angel o' de Lord come by in de darkness o' de night en slew de fust-born in all de Ian' o' Egypt. Ole Jim ain't worthy to see dis day!"
And then he just broke down and cried, he was so thankful. So between him and Tom there was talk enough, Jim being excited because the land was so full of history Joseph and his brethren, Moses in the bulrushers, Jacob coming down into Egypt to buy corn, the silver cup in the sack, and all them interesting things; and Tom just as excited too, because the land was so full of history that was in his line, about Noureddin, and Bedreddin, and such like monstrous giants, that made Jim's wool rise, and a raft of other