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About Magnanimous-Incident Literature           329
peruse one of the despised manuscripts. Having com­pleted his kindly task, he shook the poor young man cordially by the hand, saying, " I perceive merit in this; come again to me on Monday." At the time specified, the celebrated author, with a sweet smile, but saying nothing, spread open a magazine which was damp from the press. What was the poor young man's astonishment to discover upon the printed page his own article. " How can I ever," said he, falling upon his knees and bursting into tears, " testify my gratitude for this noble conduct!"
The celebrated author was the renowned Snodgrass; the poor young beginner thus rescued from obscurity and starvation was the afterwards equally renowned Snagsby. Let this pleasing incident admonish us to turn a charitable ear to all beginners that need help.
The next week Snagsby was back with five rejected manuscripts. The celebrated author was a little sur­prised, because in the books the young struggler had needed but one lift, apparently. However, he plowed through these papers, removing unnecessary flowers and digging up some acres of adjective stumps, and then succeeded in getting two of the articles accepted.
A week or so drifted by, and the grateful Snagsby arrived with another cargo. The celebrated author had felt a mighty glow of satisfaction within himself the first time he had successfully befriended the poor young struggler, and had compared himself with the generous people in the books with high gratification; but he was beginning to suspect now that he had struck upon some­thing fresh in the noble-episode line. His enthusiasm took a chill. Still, he could not bear to repulse this