THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER - online book

Original Illustrated Version By Mark Twain

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two boys flew on and on, toward the village, speech­less with horror. They glanced backward over their shoul­ders from time to time, apprehen­sively, as if they feared they might be followed. Every stump that started up in their path seemed a man and an enemy, and made them catch their breath; and as they sped by some out­lying cottages that lay near the village, the barking of the aroused watch-dogs seemed to give wings to their feet.
"If we can only get to the old tannery, before we break down!' whispered Tom, in short catches be­tween breaths, " I can't stand it much longer."
Huckleberry's hard pantings were his only reply, and the boys fixed their eyes on the goal of their hopes and bent to their work to win it. They gained steadily on it, and at last, breast to breast they burst through the open door
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