Original Illustrated Version By Mark Twain

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TOM REVEALS A SECRET.                                            137
won't we Huck? Let him go if he wants to. I reckon we can get along without him, per'aps."
But Tom was uneasy, nevertheless, and was alarmed to see Joe go sullenly on with his dressing. And then it was discomforting to see Huck eyeing Joe's prepa­rations so wistfully, and keeping up such an ominous silence. Presently, without a parting word, Joe began to wade off toward the Illinois shore. Tom's heart began to sink. He glanced at Huck. Huck could not bear the look, and dropped his eyes. Then he said :
"I want to go, too, Tom. It was getting so lonesome anyway, and now it'll be worse. Let's us go too, Tom."
" I won't! You can all go, if you want to. I mean to stay."
"Tom, I better go."
"Well go 'long—who's hendering you."
Huck began to pick up his scattered clothes. He said:
" Tom, I wisht you'd come too. Now you think it over. We'll wait for you when we get to shore."
" Well you'll wait a blame long time, that's all."
Huck started sorrowfully away, and Tom stood looking after him, with a strong desire tugging at his heart to yield his pride and go along too. He hoped the boys would stop, but they still waded slowly on. It suddenly dawned on Tom that it was become very lonely and still. He made one final struggle with his pride, and then darted after his comrades, yelling:
"Wait! Wait! I want to tell you something ! "
They presently stopped and turned around. When he got to where they were, he began unfolding his secret, and they listened moodily till at last they saw the " point" he was driving at, and then they set up a war-whoop of applause and said it was " splendid! " and said if he had told them at first, they wouldn't have started away. He made a plausible excuse; but his real reason had been the fear that not even the secret would keep them with him any very great length of time, and so he had meant to hold it in reserve as a last seduction.
The lads came gaily back and went at their sports again with a will, chattering all the time about Tom's stupendous plan and admiring the genius of it. After a