THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER - online book

Original Illustrated Version By Mark Twain

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

*74
TOM SAWYER.
Now the master, mellow almost to the verge of geniality, put his chair aside, turned his back to the audience, and began to draw a map of America on the blackboard, to exercise the geography class upon. But he made a sad business of it with his unsteady hand, and a smothered titter rippled over the house. He knew what the matter was and set himself to right it. He sponged out lines and re-made them; but he only distorted them more than ever, and the tittering was more pronounced. He threw his entire attention upon his work, now, as if determined not to be put down by the mirth. He felt that all eyes were fastened upon him; he imagined he was succeeding, and yet the tittering con≠tinued ; it even manifestly increased. And well it might. There was a garret above, pierced with a scuttle over his head; and down through this scuttle came a cat, suspended around the haunches by a 'string; she had a rag tied about her head and jaws to keep her from mewing; as she slowly de≠scended she curved upward and clawed at the string, she swung downward and clawed at the intangible air. The titter≠ing rose higher and higheróthe cat was within six inches of the absorbed teacher's headódown, down, a little lower, and