THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER - online book

Original Illustrated Version By Mark Twain

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

204                                                    TOM SAWYER.
" Oh, partly, partly. Nearly time for us to be moving, pard. What'll we do with what little swag we've got left ? "
" I don't know—leave it here as we've always done, I reckon. No use to take it away till we start south. Six hundred and fifty in silver's something to carry."
"Well—all right—it won't matter to come here once more." " No—but I'd say come in the night as we used to do—it's better." "Yes; but look here; it may be a good while before I get the right chance at that job; accidents might happen ; 'tain't in such a very good place; we'll just regularly bury it—and bury it deep."
" Good idea," said the comrade, who walked across the room, knelt down, raised one of the rearward hearthstones and took out a bag that jingled pleas­antly. He subtracted from it twenty or thirty dollars for himself and as much for Injun Joe and passed the bag to the latter, who was on his knees in the corner, now, digging with his bowie knife.
The boys forgot all their fears, all their miseries in an instant. With gloat­ing eyes they watched every movement. Luck!—the splendor of it was beyond all imagination! Six hundred dollars was money enough to make half a dozen boys rich! Here was treasure-hunting under the happiest aus­pices—there would not be any bothersome uncertainty as to where to dig. They nudged each other every moment—eloquent nudges and easily under­stood, for they simply meant—" O, but ain't you glad now we're here ! " Joe's knife struck upon something. " Hello !" said he. "What is it?" said his comrade.
"Half-rotten plank—no it's a box, I believe. Here—bear a hand and we'll see what it's here for. Never mind, I've broke a hole." He reached his hand in and drew it out—                 
"Man, it's money !"
The two men examined the handful of coins. They were gold. The boys above were as excited as themselves, and as delighted. Joe's comrade said—