Original Illustrated Version By Mark Twain

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" Becky, can you bear it if I tell you something ?"
Becky's face paled, but she thought she could.
"Well then, Becky, we must stay here, where there's water to drink. That little piece is our last candle! "
Becky gave loose to tears and wailings. Tom did what he could to comfort her but with little effect. At length Becky said:
" Tom!"
"Well, Becky?"
" They'll miss us and hunt for us! "
" Yes, they will ! Certainly they will! "
4i Maybe they're hunting for us now, Tom."
" Why I reckon maybe they are. I hope they are."
"When would they miss us, Tom?"
"When they get back to the boat, I reckon."
"Tom, it might be dark, then—would they notice we hadn't come?"
"I don't know. But anyway, your mother would miss you as soon as they got home."
A frightened look in Becky's face brought Tom to his senses and he saw that he had made a blunder. Becky was not to have gone home that night! The children became silent and thoughtful. In a moment a new burst of grief from Becky showed Tom that the thing in his mind had struck hers also—that the Sabbath, morning might be half spent before Mrs. Thatcher discovered that Becky was not at Mrs. Harper's.
The children fastened their eyes upon their bit of candle and watched it melt slowly and pitilessly away; saw the half inch of wick stand alone at last; saw the feeble flame rise and fall, climb the thin column of smoke, linger at its top a moment, and then—the horror of utter darkness reigned!
How long afterward it was that Becky came to a slow consciousness that she was crying in Tom's arms, neither could tell. All that they knew was, that after what seemed a mighty stretch of time, both awoke out of a dead stupor of sleep and resumed their miseries once more. Tom said it might be Sunday, now—maybe Monday. He tried to get Becky to talk, but her sorrows were