TREASURE ISLAND - complete online book

The Famous Pirate Adventure by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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TREASURE ISLAND
found the skeleton—it was he that had rifled it; he had found the treasure; he had dug it up (it was the shaft of his pick­ax that lay broken in the excavation); he had carried it on his back in many weary journeys from the foot of a tall pine to a cave he had on the two-pointed hill at the northeast angle of the island, and there it had lain stored in safety since two months before the arrival of the Hispaniola.
When the doctor had wormed this secret from him on the afternoon of the attack, and when, next morning, he saw the anchorage deserted, he had gone to Silver, given him the chart, which was now useless, given him the stores—for Ben Gunn's cave was well supplied with goats' meat salted by himself— given anything and everything to get a chance of moving in safety from the stockade to the two-pointed hill, there to be clear of malaria and keep a guard upon the money.
"As for you, Jim," he said, "it went against my heart, but I did what I thought best for those who had stood by their duty; and if you were not one of these, whose fault was it?"
That morning, finding that I was to be involved in the horrid disappointment he had prepared for the mutineers, he had run all the way to the cave and, leaving squire to guard the captain, had taken Gray and the maroon and started, making the diagonal across the island, to be at hand beside the pine. Soon, however, he saw that our party had the start of him; and Ben Gunn, being fleet of foot, had been despatched in front to do his best alone. Then it had occurred to him to work upon the supersti­tions of his former shipmates; and he was so far successful that Gray and the doctor had come up and were already ambushed before the arrival of the treasure-hunters.
"Ah," said Silver, "it were fortunate for me that I had Haw­kins here. You would have let old John be cut to bits and never given it a thought, Doctor."
"Not a thought," replied Dr. Livesey, cheerily.
And by this time we had reached the gigs. The doctor, with the pickax, demolished one of them, and then we all got aboard the other and set out to go round by sea for North Inlet.
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