Uncle tom's cabin - online children's book

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94
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN; OR
easy as a dog arter a coon ? These yer 's all
provi-
dences."
" They are a kind of providences that you '11 have to be pretty sparing of, Master Sam. I allow no such prac­tices with gentlemen on my place," said Mr. Shelby, with as much sternness as he could command, under the cir­cumstances.
Now, there is no more use in making believe be angry with a negro than with a child; both instinctively see the true state of the case, through all attempts to affect the contrary ; and Sam was in no wise disheartened by this rebuke, though he assumed an air of doleful gravity, and stood with the corners of his mouth lowered in most penitential style.
" Mas'r 's quite right, — quite ; it was ugly on me, — there 's no disputin' that ar; and of course Mas'r and Missis would n't encourage no such works. I 'm sensible of dat ar; but a poor nigger like me 's 'mazin' tempted to act ugly sometimes, when fellers will cut up such shines as dat ar Mas'r Haley; he an't no gen'l'man no-way; anybody 's been raised as I 've been can't help a-seein' dat ar."
" Well, Sam," said Mrs. Shelby, " as you appear to have a proper sense of your errors, you may go now and tell Aunt Chloe she may get you some of that cold ham that was left of dinner to-day. You and Andy must be hungry."
" Missis is a heap too good for us," said Sam, making his bow with alacrity, and departing.
It will be perceived, as has been before intimated, that Master Sam had a native talent that might, undoubtedly, have raised him to eminence in political life, — a talent of making capital out of everything that turned up, to be in­vested for his own especial praise and glory ; and having done up his piety and humility, as he trusted, to the satis­faction of the parlor, he clapped his palm-leaf on his head, with a sort of rakish, free-and-easy air, and proceeded to