WILLIAM - online children's book

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WILLIAM AND THE WAXWORK PRINCE 95
" Thanks. Thanks awfully. Well, let me tell you, I'm jolly well going to go to the waxworks." Suddenly he stopped and drew in his breath. An inspiration had just visited him. " Tell you what ? " he said breath­lessly. " I'll go an' be a waxwork. What about that ? I bet I'd make a fine one. I bet it would be fun. I'll go an' be a waxwork. Then I'll see 'em all right with no one saying I stole anything. An' it'll be fun standing there with all the people lookin' at me an' listenin' to what they say. I bet I can do it all right. I've got its hat here."
The suggestion rather took the Outlaws' breath away. William, having started on the path of adventure, never seemed to know when to stop.
" I bet I make a jolly good waxwork," he went on self-admiringly. " I bet that no one spots I'm not a real one. I'm wearing its clothes so it seems silly not to have a try at what I can do at being a waxwork. And then we can have a waxwork show of our own. . . ."
Douglas murmured disapprovingly, " Well, I bet you'll go an' make a mess of it," but Ginger and Henry, fired by William's enthusiasm, said : " All right. Go on and have a try. I bet they spot you're not a real one. We'll come in and watch you. It'll be fun."
They went round to the back of the tent, lay on the ground and cautiously lifted up the back flap. The in­side was still empty of human beings. A little prince in the Tower stood solitary with an empty space beside him. Evidently no one had noticed his brother's disappearance. From outside came the raucous voice of the showman informing the world that the show would open in four minutes honly from now.
William dropped his overcoat and, holding his feathered head-dress in his hand, slipped under the tent flap into the tent. There he put on his feathered velvet hat and took his place in the empty space next to the solitary prince, faithfully copying its attitude, one leg slightly forward, hands down by his side. He
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